Clear, Convincing Technology Stories

You have a story to tell about your business, its products, and its services. The catch is the story can’t be all about you.

Product features and service quality are important, but you are not the hero of the story. Your customers and future customers must be able to see themselves as the heroes. Your nifty product may be the hot rod spaceship that will ensure their victory, but you want them to envision themselves at the controls.

Technology companies often let their marketing get lost in the details. We help them tell stories that matter.

Our storytellers pay attention to the details, of course, and seek a deep understanding of them. But not all details are equally important. Not all details help tell a clear, convincing story.

Tell us your story, the way you’re telling it today, or the story you want to take to the market. We will help you tell it better, or suggest a different story that would be more effective.

Story as Brand

One way to think about a brand is the overarching story of a business.

This is the theory Donald Miller lays out in his book, Building a Story Brand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen. His nutshell description of how a story works is this: “A CHARACTER who wants something encounters a PROBLEM before they can get it. At the peak of their despair, a GUIDE steps into their lives, gives them a PLAN, and CALLS THEM TO ACTION. The action helps them avoid FAILURE and ends in a SUCCESS.”

Your customers don’t want fiction, but they have goals, and they have problems to solve. Tell a clear story about how you can be the guide who will help them avoid failure and achieve success.

More Stories That Matter

Many other stories support the overall brand story. For example:

  • Thought leadership stories. Showcases the vision and know-how with which your organization can help your companies become leaders.
  • Customer stories. Case studies of customer success with your products or services, helping readers see how they can overcome similar problems and achieve the success they crave.
  • White papers worth reading. Detailed and important information presented in a way that doesn’t overwhelm readers and still finds ways to connect back to your brand story. Consider breaking up information dense content with sidebars, graphics, and min-case studies.
  • How-to stories. Show your understanding of customer problems and how to solve them. Be generous with the information you share, building your reputation as a trusted guide, and readers will want more from you.

Brochures, landing pages, and email newsletters tell stories, too, or they ought to. Make sure they’re a good read.

How We Help

We interview your leaders and subject matter experts, gather the details, and distill them into a story or series of stories. Then we rewrite and revise until those stories are as clear and compelling as they can be.

Not every story can be an epic, but every story should engage your customers and show understanding of their hopes and fears.

Carr Communications founders David and Beth Anne Carr trained as journalists and have decades of experience in the technology industry — as well as a network of consultants with complementary skills.

David was an editor at InformationWeek, Baseline Magazine, and Internet World Magazine. More recently, has served as a writer, editor, and evangelist for technology companies. He is the author of Social Collaboration for Dummies and has spoken at tech conferences internationally. David currently blogs about digital transformation for The Enterprisers Project. He regularly interviews CIOs and other business and technology leaders about their priorities and frustrations.

Beth Anne Carr has written and edited documentation, white papers, ebooks, blogs, and thought leadership articles for companies including Hyperion Software (now part of Oracle), DataEase, RingCentral, SolarWinds, and Kony. She serves as Technology Advisory Committee chair for one of the largest school districts in the United States.

Business and Technology Domains

We’re quick studies on any topic, but here is some subject matter we know particularly well:

  • Database design
  • Web architecture
  • Mobile computing
  • Unified communications and collaboration
  • ERP and enterprise architecture
  • Digital transformation and business technology leadership
  • CIO priorities in education, healthcare, and government

Ready to Get Started?

Let’s talk about your story.